Garlic | Alixir Life

Garlic

Immunity and heart support

  • Reduces blood pressure and arterial stiffness
  • Strengthens the immune system
  • Reduces bad and increases good cholesterol
  • Traditional treatment for diabetes

OVERVIEW

Garlic reduces bad cholesterol and triglycerides, which in high levels can clog arteries and lead to stroke, but increases good cholesterol. This makes it important for heart health. It also is a potent antioxidant and may reduce the risk of several cancers.

Supplementing garlic can benefit cognition, cardiovascular health, resistance to infection, physical and sexual vitality. It also has some anti-aging properties.

Aged garlic reliably reduces Low-density Lipoprotein (LDL-C) and total cholesterol while increasing High-density Lipoprotein (HDL-C). Studies on garlic also showed a variety of anti-cancer properties. Taking garlic daily (10g or more) is associated with a significantly reduced risk of prostate, colon, and stomach cancer. It can also induce adrenaline secretion and fat loss, though in a minor way.

When garlic is physically disturbed through chewing, slicing, or crushing, it releases an alliin metabolite: allicin. Allicin turns into a variety of fat and water soluble sulfur-containing compounds. By tapping into the hydrogen sulfide signaling system, garlic relaxes the blood vessels and provides a variety of health benefits. Garlic also uses the hydrogen sulfide signaling system to exert its anti-cancer effects.[1]

Our aged Garlic extract is sourced from 100% USA organically-grown garlic bulbs. These bulbs are aged to perfection and extracted in a process that eliminates unpleasant odors so you can take it anytime and anywhere.

Product Type: 2 Veggie Capsules
Dosage: 600mg

Ingredients

Aged Garlic Extract Powder (bulb), Whey (dairy), Alginic Acid (seaweed), Silica, Cellulose and Magnesium Stearate (vegetable source). Whey derived from milk.

does not contain

eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, artificial colours or preservatives

summary of research

  • Reduces blood pressure and arterial stiffness

    A 2016 meta-analysis of Garlic’s effect on blood pressure and cholesterol found supplementation can reduce blood pressure, total cholesterol, and indicators of arterial stiffness.[2]

     

    Further studies also support Garlic’s ability to reduce blood pressure and arterial stiffness. In people with high blood pressure (around 10 points systolic or 8-10%), the reduction is quite large, whereas in people with normal blood pressure, there is a smaller but still statistically significant reduction.[3]

     

    People with arterial stiffness who supplemented Garlic daily over a few years appear to have reduced arterial stiffness compared to people who do not take consume Garlic.[4]

     

    When taken in doses of supplements, i.e.  larger than the quantities consumer in meals, Garlic also appears to reduce the buildup of platelets in arteries that lead to clots.[5]

     

    Research Score: Very Strong

  • Strengthens the immune system

    Garlic has anti-inflammatory properties and can simulate immune cells, [6] [7] which is why has been taken for centuries. Clinical research largely supports its usefulness in reducing the severity of symptoms of cold and taking less sick days. Studies also generally support Garlic’s ability to prevent the frequency of contracting colds, however it should be noted that one out of three suggests Garlic does not have any effect on preventing colds. The immunity support is thought to be due to Garlic’s increase in natural killer cell levels (the immune system’s ability to protect itself), which has been seen in both healthy people and cancer patients.[8]

     

    Illustrative Cases

     

    In a double-blind study on cold and flu prevention of 146 participants, people taking the placebo recorded 65 instances of cold whereas those taking Garlic recorded merely 24 instances. People in the placebo group also took a total of 366 days of sick leave compared to only 111 days taken by those taking Garlic. This indicates that Garlic prevents frequency of colds and quickens recovery times.[9] The rate (frequency of occurring) of the common cold has twice been found to be reduced by 60-70% in persons who take Garlic supplementation daily; this is associated with both allicin and the aged Garlic extract, and requires higher doses (2.5g aged extract).[10]

     

    In another double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 120 people, the placebo and Garlic-taking groups did not show any difference in incidence of getting colds, but those taking Garlic did have less severe symptoms and less days taken on sick leave.[11] In a 2016 another study also examined the effects of Garlic supplementation on the same number of people and made almost the exact same findings.[12]

     

    Research Score: Very Strong, Traditional

  • Mildly suppresses cancers and tumors

    Garlic has mildly suppressive effects on a variety of cancers and tumors.

     

    Tumor Growth

     

    A 2003 study found allicin, the enzyme responsible for Garlic’s distinctive smell, could suppress tumor growth without harming neighboring tissue.[13]

     

    Stomach Cancer

     

    When Garlic is added with lycopene, the antioxidant found in tomato, it is able to reduce the size of stomach cancer, although there is no effect when supplemented without lycopene.[14]

     

    Multiple Myeloma

     

    Also a 2012 study looked at the effect of a high Garlic diet, which also included shallots, on the risk factors for multiple myeloma, a blood cancer, and found there was a decrease in risk of myeloma with an Odds Ratio of 0.60 and a 95% confidence interval of 0.43-0.85.[15]

     

    Prostate Cancer

     

    Garlic also seems to prevent prostate cancer, although to a modest extent.[16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] In a pilot study on nine men suffering form prostate cancer who drank a Garlic-water drink of 1ml/kg of raw garlic daily for a month, it found garlic reduced levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA).[22]

     

    Colon Cancer

     

    Two studies show at least 1.6 servings of Garlic per day can decrease the risk of colonic adenocarcinoma, the most common type of colon cancer, by an odds ratio of 0.87 (95% CI of 0.77-0.99).[23] [24] Another study showed one or more servings a day of Garlic reduced the risk of colon cancer by 48% (RR 0.52, 95% CI 0.30–0.93) compared to none.[25]

     

    Skin tumors

     

    Applying Ajoene, a compound found in Garlic, to parts of skin with basal cell carcinoma skin tumors for at least six months halves their size and Bcl-2, a human tissue gene, expression.[26]

     

    Research Score: Promising

  • Traditional treatment for diabetes

    Garlic is also a traditional treatment for diabetes.[27] A 2017 study on Garlic’s effects on diabetes found supplementation is good for blood glucose, cholesterol levels, and total cholesterol in diabetics.[28] However, it should be noted that there is contradictory evidence on the effects of Garlic on glucose absorption.[29] Nevertheless, one study examined diabetics and the effects of Garlic on blood glucose concentrations when taken with the drug Metformin and found modest improvements, which may indicate Garlic is a helpful complement to the drug.[30] [31]

     

    Research Score: Mixed, Traditional

  • Reduces bad cholesterol and increases good cholesterol

    17 studies suggest eating raw Garlic reduces total cholesterol and bad cholesterol by 10-15%.[32] 14 studies also show Garlic increases good cholesterol in people with cardiovascular disease by the same range if people take at least 1.49mg/dL (95% CI of 0.19-2.79mg/dL).[33] They also show a reliable and significant decrease in high blood levels of cholesterol through supplementation.[34]

     

    Research Score: Very Strong

  • References

    1.

    https://tinyurl.com/z65mdh2

     

    2. Varshney R, Budoff MJ. Garlic and Heart Disease. J Nutr. 2016;146(2):416S-421S.

     

    3.

    https://tinyurl.com/y5a8x765

     

    4.

    https://tinyurl.com/y49z4lvz

     

    5.

    https://tinyurl.com/y37whr4f

     

    6. Keiss HP, Dirsch VM, Hartung T, et al. Garlic (Allium sativum L.) modulates cytokine expression in lipopolysaccharide-activated human blood thereby inhibiting NF-kappaB activity. J Nutr. 2003;133(7):2171-5.

     

    7. Arreola R, Quintero-Fabián S, López-Roa RI, et al. Immunomodulation and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Garlic Compounds. Journal of Immunology Research. 2015;2015:401630. doi:10.1155/2015/401630.

     

    8.

    https://tinyurl.com/y55otsrj

     

    9. Preventing the common cold with a garlic supplement: a double-blind, placebo-controlled survey.

    Josling P, Advances in therapy, 2001

     

    10.

    https://tinyurl.com/y5282hjk

     

    11. Supplementation with aged garlic extract improves both NK and γδ-T cell function and reduces the severity of cold and flu symptoms: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled nutrition intervention.

    Nantz MP, Rowe CA, Muller CE, Creasy RA, Stanilka JM, Percival SS., Clinical Nutrition, 2012

     

    12. Aged Garlic Extract Modifies Human Immunity, Percival SS. , The Journal of Nutrition, 2016

     

    13. Miron T, Mironchik M, Mirelman D, Wilchek M, Rabinkov A. Inhibition of tumor growth by a novel approach: in situ allicin generation using targeted alliinase delivery. Mol Cancer Ther. 2003;2(12):1295-301.

     

    14. Lee Y, et al. Anticancer activity of S-allylmercapto-L-cysteine on implanted tumor of human gastric cancer cell . Biol Pharm Bull. (2011)

     

    15. Wang Q, et al. Risk factors for multiple myeloma: a hospital-based case-control study in Northwest China . Cancer Epidemiol. (2012)

     

    16. Zhou XF, Ding ZS, Liu NB. Allium vegetables and risk of prostate cancer: evidence from 132,192 subjects . Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. (2013)

     

    17. Hardin J, Cheng I, Witte JS. Impact of consumption of vegetable, fruit, grain, and high glycemic index foods on aggressive prostate cancer risk . Nutr Cancer. (2011)

     

    18. Brasky TM, et al. Specialty supplements and prostate cancer risk in the VITamins and Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort . Nutr Cancer. (2011)

     

    19. Salem S, et al. Major dietary factors and prostate cancer risk: a prospective multicenter case-control study . Nutr Cancer. (2011)

     

    20. Hsing AW, et al. Allium vegetables and risk of prostate cancer: a population-based study . J Natl Cancer Inst. (2002)

     

    21. Galeone C, et al. Onion and garlic use and human cancer . Am J Clin Nutr. (2006)

     

    22. Consumption of aqueous garlic extract leads to significant improvement in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer .

     

    23. Witte JS, et al. Relation of vegetable, fruit, and grain consumption to colorectal adenomatous polyps . Am J Epidemiol. (1996)

     

    24. Millen AE, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and prevalence of colorectal adenoma in a cancer screening trial . Am J Clin Nutr. (2007)

     

    25. Steinmetz KA, et al. Vegetables, fruit, and colon cancer in the Iowa Women's Health Study . Am J Epidemiol. (1994)

     

    26. Tilli CM, et al. The garlic-derived organosulfur component ajoene decreases basal cell carcinoma tumor size by inducing apoptosis . Arch Dermatol Res. (2003)

     

    27. Ryan EA, Pick ME, Marceau C. Use of alternative medicines in diabetes mellitus . Diabet Med. (2001)

     

    28. Wang J, Zhang X, Lan H, Wang W. Effect of garlic supplement in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM): a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Food & Nutrition Research. 2017;61(1):1377571. doi:10.1080/

    16546628.2017.1377571.

     

    29. Cazzola R, Camerotto C, Cestaro B. Anti-oxidant, anti-glycant, and inhibitory activity against α-amylase and α-glucosidase of selected spices and culinary herbs . Int J Food Sci Nutr. (2011)

     

    30. Ashraf R, Khan RA, Ashraf I. Garlic (Allium sativum) supplementation with standard antidiabetic agent provides better diabetic control in type 2 diabetes patients . Pak J Pharm Sci. (2011)

     

    31. Kumar R, et al. Antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, anti-inflammatory and adenosine deaminase- lowering effects of garlic in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with obesity . Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes. (2013)

     

    32.

    https://tinyurl.com/y2g2vrbg

     

    33.

    https://tinyurl.com/y3efbffw

     

    34.

    https://tinyurl.com/y5ma5gvg