Vitamin C | Alixir Life

Vitamin C

Immunity Upgrade

  • Boosts the immune system
  • Improves cardiovascular health
  • May promote joint health and help form collagen

OVERVIEW

Vitamin C is a strong antioxidant capable of improving your body’s natural defenses.[1] It can help neutralise harmful free radicals that promote oxidative stress, which is linked to many common diseases.[2] It also reduces the risk of heart disease, increases blood flow and promotes bone and joint health.

Vitamin C can be consumed directly from fruits and vegetables, like oranges and broccoli. But if you are not eating a lot of these, you should consider supplementing Vitamin C to make sure you get your recommended daily amount.

Note that Vitamin C may interfere with the effectiveness of some HIV medications and should not be taken immediately after aluminum-based antacids since it increases the absorption of iron and aluminum. Please consult your doctor if you are on any such medications.[3]

Our Vitamin C supplement is manufactured in Scotland and was chosen for its quality, absorption, traceability, and sustainability.

Product Type: 1 Veggie Capsule
Dosage: 1000mg


Ingredients

Vitamin C (as Quali-C ascorbic acid), Modified cellulose (vegetarian capsule).

does not contain

milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybeans

summary of research

  • Boosts the immune system for those under physical stress

    Increasing Vitamin C intake can lessen the severity of colds for athletes and others who put their bodies under stress if it is taken regularly before the onset of first symptoms.[4] [5]

     

    Illustrative Studies

     

    In a review of over 60 studies on how the common cold is influenced by Vitamin C, the six largest ones indicated that although Vitamin C does not prevent colds or reduce the duration of them in the average adult, it may prevent colds if the individual in question is under acute physical stress.[6] The four largest studies found that although Vitamin C does not reduce the duration of

    colds, two of them showed a 12-41% decrease in work or school sick leave, which could show that Vitamin C can minimise symptoms of the cold.[7] Moreover, three studies found Vitamin C intake led to a 80% decrease in pneumonia occurring.

     

    In another review of 3 placebo-controlled studies that examined the effect of Vitamin C on skiers, military troops and ultra-marathon runner (i.e. people who undergo acute physical stress), each group experienced a significant reduction in how often the cold occurred. In fact, the study of ultra-marathon runners showed a 35% decrease in the occurrence of colds if 600mg of Vitamin C was supplemented daily.[8]

     

    Research Score: Strong

  • Improves cardiovascular health

    Vitamin C notably helps reduce risk factors associated with heart disease such as hypertension, high levels of LDL cholesterol, and elevated triglyceride levels.[9] One study found that people who took 700 mg of Vitamin C daily for 10 years had a 25% lower risk of heart disease.[10] An increase in blood flow is seen where there previously was impaired blood flow (smoking, obesity, etc.), which may be due to preservation of nitric oxide function (via reducing oxidation, a phenomena general to antioxidants and not unique to Vitamin C).[11] Also Vitamin C supplementation can reduce C-Reactive Protein (indicator of cardiovascular disease and arterial plaque).[12]

     

    Research Score: Strong

  • May promote joint health and help form collagen

    Antioxidants appear to minimize the rate of bone mineral density loss in older women, although research is mixed and where positive, results are minimal.[13] Vitamin C is an anti-oxidant and is a component of collagen synthesis. Without Vitamin C, joint health will be adversely affected.[14] [15] However, Vitamin C supplementation appears to have a more prominent effect upon complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic condition of swollen joints and changes in hair and skin appearance.

     

    Research Score: Mixed

  • References

    1.

    Alessio HM, Goldfarb AH, Cao G. Exercise-induced oxidative stress before and after vitamin C supplementation. Int J Sport Nutr. 1997;7(1):1-9.

     

    2.

    Pham-Huy LA, He H, Pham-Huy C., Free radicals, antioxidants in disease and health., Int J Biomed Sci. 2008 Jun;4(2):89-96.,

    https://tinyurl.com/yy7xuwv4

    (accessed 20 March 2019)

     

    3.

    https://tinyurl.com/y4aser8e

     

    4.

    Wintergerst ES, Maggini S, Hornig DH. Immune-enhancing role of vitamin C and zinc and effect on clinical conditions. Ann Nutr Metab. 2006;50(2):85-94.

     

    5.

    Sasazuki S, Sasaki S, Tsubono Y, Okubo S, Hayashi M, Tsugane S. Effect of vitamin C on common cold: randomized controlled trial. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006;60(1):9-17.

     

    6.

    Vitamin C and common cold incidence- a review of studies with subjects under heavy physical stress

    Hemilä H., International journal of sports medicine, 1996

     

    7.

    Vitamin C and acute respiratory infections

    Hemilä H & Douglas RM. , International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 1999

     

    8.

    Vitamin C supplementation reduces the incidence of postrace symptoms of upper-respiratory-tract infection in ultramarathon runners.

    Peters EM, Goetzsche JM, Grobbelaar B, Noakes TD., The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1993

     

    9.

    Moser MA, Chun OK. Vitamin C and Heart Health: A Review Based on Findings from Epidemiologic Studies. Lamuela-Raventós R, ed. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2016;17(8):1328. doi:10.3390/ijms17081328.

     

    10.

    Knekt P, Ritz J, Pereira MA, et al. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk: a pooled analysis of 9 cohorts. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80(6):1508-20.

     

    11.

    https://tinyurl.com/y6gj8amo

     

    12.

    https://tinyurl.com/yxjx489y

     

    13.

    https://tinyurl.com/y4q298m2

     

    14.

    https://tinyurl.com/y3ybofpq

     

    15.

    https://tinyurl.com/y5vv7q4y