Vitamin D | Alixir Life

Vitamin D

Sunny D

  • Strengthens bones
  • Increases the production of testosterone
  • Improves insulin secretion and sensitivity
  • May reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease

OVERVIEW

If you don’t get a regular dose of sun (for example you avoid the sun, always wear sunscreen or don’t live near the equator), you may not be getting enough Vitamin D. Vitamin D can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, fix calcium to bones, increase insulin secretion and regulate testosterone levels.

Our Vitamin D is in its D3 form, which is the natural form of Vitamin D your body makes from sunlight and therefore is more bioavailable than D2.

Product Type: 1 Softgel
Dosage: 5000 IU

Ingredients

Vitamin D3 (as Cholecalciferol) (from Lanolin), Softgel Capsule (bovine gelatin, water, glycerin) and Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Other Ingredients: Xylitol, Cellulose, Sorbitol, Stearic Acid (vegetable source), Silica, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Natural Peppermint Flavor and Natural Vanilla Flavor.

does not contain

milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, peanuts, wheat, soybeans, artificial colours or preservatives

summary of research

  • Strengthens bones and reduces risk of falls in the elderly

    One of the prominent symptoms of Vitamin D deficiency is rickets, a condition characterized by bone abnormalities and reduced bone density.[1] Another more common deficiency-linked disease is osteoporosis.[2] Studies indicate that supplementing Vitamin D daily can also improve muscle strength, thereby significantly decreasing the risk of fall and consequential bone fractures. Studies concluded that doses higher than 700 IU per day were required and protection from falls could be enhanced by supplementing with Calcium, and potentially Vitamin K, at the same time.[3]

     

    Research Score: Strong

  • Increases the production of testosterone

    Testosterone is a key steroid hormone produced by both men and women. This hormone stimulates the growth and development of bones, muscle mass, and even improves libido and mood.

    In women, testosterone is an essential precursor to estrogen and helps grow, support and protect reproductive tissues[4] as well as maintaining bone mass[5] and mood.

     

    In men, a deficiency in Vitamin D has been linked to hypogonadism, a condition where the body ceases to produce sex hormones.[6] Vitamin D receptors can be found on sperm cells and may also play a role in the production of steroid hormones. As we age, testosterone production naturally declines, but recent studies suggest taking Vitamin D could help delay this occurrence.[7]

     

    Illustrative Studies

     

    In a study on men with low Vitamin D levels, supplementing Vitamin D3 over the course of a year led to an increase in testosterone levels. Since the participants were all middle-aged men, however, they may have started the experiment from a state of age-related testosterone decline. The effect of Vitamin D supplementation on younger men is currently unknown.[8]

     

    Research Score: Strong

  • May reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and lower blood pressure

    Several studies indicate that supplementing Vitamin D may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and secondary complications.[9] [10] There is also mixed evidence with regards to Vitamin D lowering blood pressure. Where there are positive results, the degree is quite small.[11]

     

    Research Score: Mixed

  • Improves insulin secretion and sensitivity

    Studies in both men and women have noted that supplementing Vitamin D can improve insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in diabetics (type II mostly) and in persons at risk for diabetes, which is thought to be secondary to increasing insulin secretion of the pancreas.[12] [13]

     

    Research Score: Strong

  • References

    1.

    Vitamin D - Fact Sheet for Health Professionals

    National Institute of Health - Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institute of Health - Office of Dietary Supplements, 2016

     

    2.

    Dobnig H. A review of the health consequences of the vitamin D deficiency pandemic. J Neurol Sci. 2011;311(1-2):15-8.

     

    3.

    https://tinyurl.com/y5wkabxr

     

    4.

    Manni A, Pardridge WM, Cefalu W, Nisula BC, Bardin CW, Santner SJ, Santen RJ., Bioavailability of albumin-bound testosterone., J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1985 Oct;61(4):705-10.,

    https://tinyurl.com/yywobc3m

    (accessed March 13, 2019)

     

    5.

    Sato Y, Iwamoto J, Kanoko T, Satoh K., Low-dose vitamin D prevents muscular atrophy and reduces falls and hip fractures in women after stroke: a randomized controlled trial., Cerebrovasc Dis. 2005;20(3):187-92. Epub 2005 Jul 27.,

    https://tinyurl.com/y5l99vux

    (accessed March 13, 2019)

     

    6.

    Wang N, Han B, Li Q, et al. Vitamin D is associated with testosterone and hypogonadism in Chinese men: Results from a cross-sectional SPECT-China study. Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology?: RB&E. 2015;13:74. doi:10.1186/s12958-015-0068-2.

     

    7.

    Pilz S, Frisch S, Koertke H, et al. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on testosterone levels in men. Horm Metab Res. 2011;43(3):223-5.

     

    8.

    Examine.com Testosterone Stack Guide

     

    9.

    https://tinyurl.com/yxpfs5bl

     

    10.

    Zittermann A1Frisch SBerthold HKGötting CKuhn JKleesiek KStehle PKoertke HKoerfer R., ‘Vitamin D supplementation enhances the beneficial effects of weight loss on cardiovascular disease risk markers.’, Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 May;89(5):1321-7,

    https://tinyurl.com/y2ho2grh

    (accessed 25 Feb 2019)

     

    11.

    https://tinyurl.com/y5oho3q6

     

    12.

    https://tinyurl.com/y62a5oec

     

    13.

    https://tinyurl.com/y6359wyh